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Worldwide Telemedicine Can Help SITUATIONAL ANALYSIS

Read the scenarios below to learn how Worldwide Telemedicine can provide the most comprehensive medical care available to reduce emergency transports and effectively manage injuries in real-time.

Scenario 1 – Chest Pain No Evacuation

A patient visited the on-site paramedic with moderate chest pain. The paramedic took the patient’s medical history and immediately patched in the company’s case coordinator and rang the ER doctor on-call.

After reviewing the paramedic’s notes and patient’s medical history, the doctor directed the paramedic to hook the patient up to the EKG and begin monitoring his heart rate. The EKG information was transmitted through the telemedicine unit with HIPAA compliance.

The paramedic performed point of care testing which included a cardiac blood test. The blood sample was put in a meter giving the physician a result within 5-10 minutes. Also, the doctor listened to the patient’s heart and lungs through a stethoscope hooked up to the unit.

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After the testing, the doctor confirmed that the patient was not having a heart attack. After discussing with the case coordinator, the doctor directed the patient to take the aspirin that the paramedic had in his travel kit, thus avoiding an OSHA recordable and an unnecessary emergency transfer.

Chest Pain Cost Analysis

Worldwide Telemedicine

Without Worldwide Telemedicine 

Telemedicine Unit – Day Rate $850 *Helicopter Evacuation $65,000
Paramedic with supplies – Day Rate $700
Total Cost: $1,550 Total Cost: $65,000

 

Scenario 2 – Chest Pain Evacuation

A patient visited the on-site paramedic because he was having severe chest pain. The company’s case coordinator was called and the paramedic immediately rang the ER doctor on-call.

The doctor reviewed the patient’s medical history and heart rate within minutes of receiving the page from the paramedic. The patient was connected to the EKG on the telemedicine unit and received point of cardiac care testing. A cardiac blood test was administered and the patient was hooked up to a stethoscope via the Worldwide Telemedicine unit for the doctor to listen to the patient’s heart and lungs.

Within five minutes of receiving the blood sample results via the Worldwide Telemedicine unit, the doctor confirmed that the patient was having a heart attack.

Emergency transport was arranged right away – however there was bad weather and the helicopter was delayed for two hours. The doctor directed the paramedic to administer an IV, heprin, oxygen, a beta blocker, nitroglycerin and an aspirin. With the Worldwide Telemedicine unit, the doctor and paramedic were able to create a “virtual ER” which saved the patient’s life while waiting on transport.

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The patient was stabilized and the helicopter arrived. Once in the air, the paramedic continued to transmit information to the doctor via the telemedicine unit until arriving in the ER so the patient never had a lapse in treatment.

Treatment of Cardiac Arrest

With Worldwide Telemedicine a “Virtual ER” is established, administering: Without Worldwide Telemedicine an EMT administers:
  • IV
  • Heprin
  • Beta Blockers
  • Aspirin
  • Oxygen
  • Nitroglycerin
  • TPA (if indicated)
  • Oxygen
  • Aspirin

Scenario 3 – Eye Injury No Corneal Abrasion

A patient came to the on-site paramedic complaining of debris in his eye. The paramedic inspected the eye which appeared irritated, but could not see any foreign matter upon a basic visual inspection. The paramedic numbed and irrigated the eye. He then notified the company case coordinator on-call, who directed him to ring the ER doctor via the Worldwide Telemedicine unit.

The patient recounted the incident with the case coordinator and the paramedic relayed his initial notes with the doctor.

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After discussing with the case coordinator, the doctor directed the paramedic to administer Fluoroscene drops and hook up the ophthalmoscope to the telemedicine unit. Receiving high-resolution real-time video of the affected eye, the doctor was able to inspect the eye and confirm that there was no corneal abrasion. The paramedic used the ophthalmoscope to take high-resolution photos of the affected eye for the case coordinator to retain for the case file.

After performing a visual acuity test, the paramedic administered artificial tear eye drops and the patient was cleared to return to work.

With the case coordinator involved early on and the doctor’s ability to inspect the eye with high resolution imagery to determine there was no abrasion, the company was able to avoid an unnecessary OSHA recordable.

Scenario 4 – Eye Injury Corneal Burn

A worker was passing by an area where another worker was welding. He was not wearing safety glasses as he was quickly passing through and was not unreasonably close to the welding. Wind picked up and a spark flew into the passing worker’s eye.

The worker immediately visited the on-site paramedic who irrigated and numbed the eye. The paramedic then rang the case coordinator to record the patient’s statement and also rang the ER doctor on-call.

The doctor directed the paramedic to numb the eye and hook up the ophthalmoscope to the telemedicine unit. Receiving the high-resolution real-time video of the affected eye, the doctor was able to inspect the eye and confirm that the eye had been mildly burned by the spark. The paramedic used the ophthalmoscope to take high-resolution photos of the affected eye for the case coordinator to retain for the case file.

The doctor directed the paramedic to administer antibiotic eye drops. The patient returned the next day for follow up treatment. Via the Worldwide Telemedicine equipment, the doctor inspected the eye and determined it had healed. After the doctor’s discussion with the case coordinator, the patient was cleared to return to work.

In this scenario, the doctor was able to immediately treat and diagnose the burn without unnecessary transport and enabled the patient to return back to work with as little downtime as possible. 

Scenario 5 – Eye Injury Foreign Object in Eye

A patient visited the on-site paramedic complaining that something felt “stuck” in his eye. The paramedic inspected the eye and noticed there did appear to be a small piece of metal in the eye. He irrigated and numbed the eye prior to patching in the case coordinator to record the worker’s statement. The paramedic also rang the ER doctor on-call.

The doctor directed the paramedic to hook up the ophthalmoscope to the telemedicine unit. Receiving the high-resolution, real-time video of the affected eye, the doctor was able to inspect the eye and confirm that there was a foreign objected lodged deeply in the eye – unable to be removed by the paramedic. The paramedic used the ophthalmoscope to take high-resolution photos of the affected eye for the case coordinator to retain for the case file.

The doctor discussed with the case coordinator and transport was arranged as the patient needed to be transferred to a medical facility to have the object removed.

In this instance, the patient was able to be transported by boat at a lower cost to the company and the foreign object was removed before the eye could heal over the object, allowing the worker a speedier recovery. Since the case coordinator was involved from the very beginning of the incident and had high-resolution images of the eye on file, the accuracy of the OSHA recordable was indisputable.

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Common Eye Injury Cost Analysis- Burn or Scratch

Worldwide Telemedicine

Without Worldwide Telemedicine

Telemedicine Unit – Day Rate $850 *Helicopter Evacuation $65,000
Paramedic with supplies – Day Rate $700 Treatment at Occ. Med. Clinic $200
Total Cost: $1,550 Total Cost: $65,200

 

*Without a doctor to confirm an abrasion had not taken place or to treat a corneal burn, transport would have been necessary.